Article: What to do at a new workplace

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What to do at a new workplace

When you start working at a new place, do not make mistakes that could harm your career and reputation
What to do at a new workplace

When you start your career or change your job, you might be professionally qualified to take on the challenges of your new job, but what about your attitude, temperament, behaviour and soft skills?  Read on to find out more about the checklist to keep in mind, without committing any major professional hara-kiri.

Adapt to your current office culture

The best part of your previous office might have been the culture, which you wished you could carry with you.  But it does not work like that at all in the corporate world.  Each office comes with its own practices and norms of functioning.  Adhere and adapt to this as soon as possible, though it might be very difficult to do so in the beginning.  Do not do as you please or follow the previous office’s schedule.  It could be various things – for example, eating at your desk, taking a break in between work and talking to your colleagues, the way the office handles communication, paper work or even the dress code.  If you try to be different and show disrespect or disregard, you could end up offending the boss or being left out by colleagues.

Follow the middle path – do not be too silent or too talkative

It is natural to feel intimidated in a new set-up, but do not isolate yourself.  If you are too silent, you could be perceived as a snob or having a low self-esteem.  On the other hand, talking too much, pulling rank or showing off your credentials might not go down very well with your colleagues, who might not be very inclusive.  Strike a balance and walk the middle path.  Be observant, prudent, diplomatic and show a willingness to learn.

Never ever mention the previous office

It is understandable to compare things between the new and the old offices and it is definitely not easy to give up familiarity and comfort and go on an uncharted course.  But if you do, it would be taken as criticism towards the new office and it might upset your colleagues and bosses.  Do not be in a hurry to change the work systems.  Be a keen observer of the things around you and if you must bring in changes, do it in a slow and gradual manner.

Improve personal habits

If you want to be treated with respect and accepted as a part of the office, then you would need to change your habits, that is, if you have any bad ones, to begin with.  You will be perceived according to the way you dress, treat the support staff, keep your work area, talk on the phone, handle personal matters and treat your work.  If your work area is messy, speak rudely to housekeeping, come in late and leave early and are sloppy at work, you will not be tolerated for long.  These things might have been accepted in your previous office, but it would be prudent to change to a better person now.

In the early days of a new workplace, keep your eyes and ears open and observe, before blending in well with the new office culture and work systems.

Topics: Watercooler

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