News: Ex- employee takes Infosys to the court over unpaid dues

#Corporate

Ex- employee takes Infosys to the court over unpaid dues

In the court filing, he highlighted that he worked eleven hours every day and received payment for eight hours or less because CVS refused to be billed for overtime wages
Ex- employee takes Infosys to the court over unpaid dues

An ex-employee of Information Technology firm Infosys has filed a lawsuit against the company for making him work overtime without pay. According to a business daily, Anuj Kapoor has alleged that he was unpaid for the overtime work that he did for a CVS project in Rhode Island. 

In the court filing, he highlighted that he worked eleven hours every day and received payment for eight hours or less because CVS refused to be billed for overtime wages. According to the business daily, Kapoor’s manager told him that he would be sent back to India if he refuses working more than 40 hours a week. 

Kapoor also claimed that his manager mentioned extra work would be provided without any billing because Infosys was looking to replace a competing company as CVS’ primary software service vendor.

Infosys denied all such allegations made by the employee and the company would defend itself in this case. “Infosys seeks to comply with all laws throughout the United States,” said a company spokesperson on the matter. 

This is not the first time that a lawsuit has been filed against Infosys, last year, ex- white employees in Plano the company has faced a discrimination lawsuit asserting that it creates a hostile work environment for workers who don't belong to India or South Asia.

Also in the year 2008, Infosys has paid a hefty amount of $26 million to the California Division of Labour Standards Enforcement to settle an investigation into unpaid overtime.

Topics: Corporate, Others

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