Article: How can organisations overcome their learning deficit?

Learning & Development

How can organisations overcome their learning deficit?

Despite an overwhelming endorsement for learning by employees, only single-digit learners benefit from the plethora of learning resources offered at work. Why do learning rates struggle to cross single digits in many organisations?
How can organisations overcome their learning deficit?

In today's fast-evolving business environment, the value proposition of jobs is shifting. A LinkedIn study reports that employees are increasingly evaluating potential employers based on the long-term value proposition of personal and professional growth opportunities. In fact, 94 per cent of respondents to the study said they would stay in a company longer if it invested in their learning and development.

Despite such an overwhelming endorsement for learning by employees, the reality is that only single-digit learners benefit from the plethora of learning resources offered at work. So, why do learning rates struggle to cross single digits in many organisations?

There are four key questions to ask to build a learning organisation in a truly digital way and overcome the learning deficit.

Are you building a learning organisation?

A learning organisation is one that prioritises personal and professional growth through continuous knowledge transfer. Such organisations encourage learning as part of their fundamental work culture and vision for long-term success.

Why is transforming into a learning organisation important in today’s business environment?

The transition to digital workplace models, the emergence of new working styles, remote work, changing business models, and customer preferences have led to paradigm shifts. Today's post-pandemic business culture requires organisations to make their most vital asset, their people, more agile, productive, effective, and future-ready.

Learning organisations can be more effective in filling gaps and white spaces that have emerged in the aftermath of the pandemic. With continuous knowledge sharing and team learning being a key attribute, a learning organization can easily solve for the mentoring deficit that is being observed across the globe.

Are you providing learning to enhance present skillsets or those required in the future?

Most organisations still perceive learning to be rooted in organisational delivery, not individual growth. Employee learning should not be just for delivery today but for employee growth and development to make them ready for tomorrow. This mindset shift is a win-win for both the organisation and the employee.

How can you provide learning through a digital experience?

The primary step is to understand why employees would invest time in learning programmes and how to customise the user experience to suit their needs. It is essential to tailor each employee's journey to address the development required, taking into account the mode of learning and individual preferences. This helps increase the probability of sustained changed behaviour and improves individual and organisational performance.

According to a LinkedIn study, 54 per cent of employees would spend more time learning if they had specific course recommendations to help them reach their career goals. Identifying existing skills gaps and mapping them to an employee's future career goals is crucial to provide employees with an appropriate and clearly defined roadmap to the tools and resources that will help them grow. 

Continuous evaluations to assess an employee's level of knowledge enhancement through the programs are necessary, as is offering mentoring and guidance to help employees use new skills in real-time.

The last step is to create relevant growth opportunities for employees. All of these efforts should be underpinned by a focus on user experience, a key differentiator for a truly learning organisation. Digital learning is not just computer-based learning, or a course uploaded on a platform or website. Learning turns digital when it keeps the user experience at its core.

In conclusion, building a learning organisation in a truly digital way requires a deep understanding of the employees' learning needs and preferences, a focus on individual growth and development, and a commitment to continuous knowledge transfer. 

Organisations that prioritise learning and development as part of their fundamental work culture and overall vision for long-term success will be better equipped to adapt to the fast-evolving business environment, fill gaps and white spaces, and enhance their employees' skills for the future. 

By asking four key questions outlined in this article, organisations can gain the perspective they need to build a learning organisation that is truly digital, and that provides a customised, engaging, and effective learning experience for every employee. 

 

Read full story

Topics: Learning & Development, #ReimagineLearning

Did you find this story helpful?

Author


QUICK POLL

How do you envision AI transforming your work?

Be Heard: Share Your Feedback and Recommend Our Content!

01
10
Selected Score :