News: Only skilled foreign workers are allowed

Employee Relations

Only skilled foreign workers are allowed

Indian Govt. issue new rules for issuing work visas to foreigners, though these will remove the limit on the number of foreigners a firm can employ and scrap a minimum fixed salary, they seek to clearly articulate the philosophy that should guide the hiring of foreigners: Indians first.

Indian Govt. issue new rules for issuing work visas to foreigners, though these will remove the limit on the number of foreigners a firm can employ and scrap a minimum fixed salary, they seek to clearly articulate the philosophy that should guide the hiring of foreigners: Indians first.

Previously, Indian firms had to limit their foreign hires to 1% of their workforce and pay them at least $25,000 a year (Rs11.68 lakh). Both restrictions have been scrapped in the new rules that were communicated to the ministry of external affairs and to all the Indian diplomatic missions.

The new rules come into effect immediately. It was said that only “skilled” foreign workers will be given work visas and not unskilled workers, as that work can be performed by Indians. The objective is to issue visas to those, who bring technical expertise into the country and increase employment of the country by restricting the unskilled workers.

India’s rules for issuing work visas to foreigners have been continually evolving. The salary stipulation that has now been scrapped was already discussed in April.

However, the new rules will be cheered by non-governmental organizations (NGOs); foreigners applying for a work visa in India to work at or volunteer in such organizations will now be given visas—a change from the earlier regime. People who were earlier facing problems; now they will be given employment visa even if their income from their NGO is nil.
 

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Topics: Employee Relations, Skilling, #Updates

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